The death of Aztec Tenochtitlan, the life of Mexico City

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Publisher:
University of Texas Press,
Pub. Date:
2015.
Language:
English
Description
"The capital of the Aztec empire, Tenochtitlan, was, in its era, one of the largest cities in the world. Built on an island in the middle of a shallow lake, its population numbered perhaps 150,000, with another 350,000 people in the urban network clustered around the lake shores. In 1521, at the height of Tenochtitlan's power, which extended over much of Central Mexico, Hernando Cortes and his followers conquered the city. Cortes boasted to King Charles V of Spain that Tenochtitlan was 'destroyed and razed to the ground.' But was it? Drawing on period representations of the city in sculptures, texts, and maps, The Death of Aztec Tenochtitlan, the Life of Mexico City builds a convincing case that this global capital remained, through the sixteenth century, very much an AmerIndian city. Barbara E. Mundy foregrounds the role the city's indigenous peoples, the Nahua, played in shaping Mexico City through the construction of permanent architecture and engagement in ceremonial actions. She demonstrates that the Aztec ruling elites, who retained power even after the conquest, were instrumental in building and then rebuilding the city. Mundy shows how the Nahua entered into mutually advantageous alliances with the Franciscans to maintain the city's sacred nodes. She also focuses on the practical and symbolic role of the city's extraordinary waterworks--the product of a massive ecological manipulation begun in the fifteenth century--to reveal how the Nahua struggled to maintain control of water resources in early Mexico City"--
"In 1325, the Aztecs founded their capital city Tenochtitlan, which grew to be one of the world's largest cities before it was violently destroyed in 1521 by conquistadors from Spain and their indigenous allies. Re-christened and reoccupied by the Spanish conquerors as Mexico City, it became the pivot of global trade linking Europe and Asia in the 17th century, and one of the modern world's most populous metropolitan areas. However, the Aztec city of Tenochtitlan and its people did not entirely disappear when the Spanish conquistadors destroyed it. By reorienting Mexico City-Tenochtitlan as a colonial capital and indigenous city, Mundy demonstrates its continuity across time. Using maps, manuscripts, and artworks, she draws out two themes: the struggle for power by indigenous city rulers and the management and manipulation of local ecology, especially water, that was necessary to maintain the city's sacred character. What emerges is the story of a city-within-a city that continues to this day"--
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ISBN:
9780292766563
9780292766570
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Grouped Work ID4dd40c10-00f6-4caa-5484-a754191c8b7d
Grouping Titledeath of aztec tenochtitlan the life of mexico city
Grouping Authorbarbara e mundy
Grouping Categorybook
Grouping LanguageEnglish (eng)
Last Grouping Update2021-07-06 23:24:06PM
Last Indexed2021-07-30 07:09:16AM
Novelist Primary ISBNnone

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authorMundy, Barbara E.,
author_displayMundy, Barbara E
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detailed_location_aimslibraryAims Greeley Circulation
display_description"The capital of the Aztec empire, Tenochtitlan, was, in its era, one of the largest cities in the world. Built on an island in the middle of a shallow lake, its population numbered perhaps 150,000, with another 350,000 people in the urban network clustered around the lake shores. In 1521, at the height of Tenochtitlan's power, which extended over much of Central Mexico, Hernando Cortes and his followers conquered the city. Cortes boasted to King Charles V of Spain that Tenochtitlan was 'destroyed and razed to the ground.' But was it? Drawing on period representations of the city in sculptures, texts, and maps, The Death of Aztec Tenochtitlan, the Life of Mexico City builds a convincing case that this global capital remained, through the sixteenth century, very much an AmerIndian city. Barbara E. Mundy foregrounds the role the city's indigenous peoples, the Nahua, played in shaping Mexico City through the construction of permanent architecture and engagement in ceremonial actions. She demonstrates that the Aztec ruling elites, who retained power even after the conquest, were instrumental in building and then rebuilding the city. Mundy shows how the Nahua entered into mutually advantageous alliances with the Franciscans to maintain the city's sacred nodes. She also focuses on the practical and symbolic role of the city's extraordinary waterworks--the product of a massive ecological manipulation begun in the fifteenth century--to reveal how the Nahua struggled to maintain control of water resources in early Mexico City"-- "In 1325, the Aztecs founded their capital city Tenochtitlan, which grew to be one of the world's largest cities before it was violently destroyed in 1521 by conquistadors from Spain and their indigenous allies. Re-christened and reoccupied by the Spanish conquerors as Mexico City, it became the pivot of global trade linking Europe and Asia in the 17th century, and one of the modern world's most populous metropolitan areas. However, the Aztec city of Tenochtitlan and its people did not entirely disappear when the Spanish conquistadors destroyed it. By reorienting Mexico City-Tenochtitlan as a colonial capital and indigenous city, Mundy demonstrates its continuity across time. Using maps, manuscripts, and artworks, she draws out two themes: the struggle for power by indigenous city rulers and the management and manipulation of local ecology, especially water, that was necessary to maintain the city's sacred character. What emerges is the story of a city-within-a city that continues to this day"--
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record_details
Bib IdFormatFormat CategoryEditionLanguagePublisherPublication DatePhysical DescriptionAbridged
proquestebookwestern:EBC3443767eBookeBookFirst edition.EnglishUniversity of Texas Press, 2015.1 online resource (257 pages) : illustrations (some color), maps.
ils:.b64130368BookBooksEnglishUniversity of Texas Press, 2015.ix, 246 pages : illustrations, maps ; 29 cm.
ebraryccu:EBC3443767eBookeBookFirst edition.EnglishUniversity of Texas Press, 2015.1 online resource (257 pages) : illustrations (some color), maps.
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Bib IdItem IdGrouped StatusStatusLocally OwnedAvailableHoldableBookableIn Library Use OnlyLibrary OwnedHoldable PTypesBookable PTypesLocal Url
ils:.b64130368.i137550492On ShelfOn Shelffalsetruetruefalsefalsetrue188, 189, 190, 191
seriesJoe R. and Teresa Lozano Long series in Latin American and Latino art and culture
series_with_volumeJoe R. and Teresa Lozano Long series in Latin American and Latino art and culture|
subject_facetArchitecture -- Mexico -- Mexico City -- History
Aztecs -- Mexico -- Mexico City -- History
Electronic books
Mexico City (Mexico) -- Environmental conditions
Mexico City (Mexico) -- History -- 16th century
Mexico City (Mexico) -- History -- To 1519
Mexico City (Mexico) -- Social life and customs
Nahuas -- Mexico -- Mexico City -- History
Power (Social sciences) -- Mexico -- Mexico City -- History
Sacred space -- Mexico -- Mexico City -- History
Water-supply -- Mexico -- Mexico City -- History
title_displayThe death of Aztec Tenochtitlan, the life of Mexico City
title_fullThe death of Aztec Tenochtitlan, the life of Mexico City / Barbara E. Mundy
title_shortThe death of Aztec Tenochtitlan, the life of Mexico City
topic_facetArchitecture
Aztecs
Environmental conditions
History
Nahuas
Power (Social sciences)
Sacred space
Social life and customs
Water-supply