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The sound of tomorrow: how electronic music was smuggled into the mainstream
(Book)

Book Cover
Average Rating
Author:
Published:
New York : Bloomsbury, 2012.
Format:
Book
ISBN:
9780826424525, 082642452X
Physical Desc:
xi, 272 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Status:
Aims Greeley Circulation
ML1380 .B745 2012
Description

Monterey Pop Festival, 1967. Bernie Krause and Paul Beaver demonstrate a Moog synthesizer to the assembled rock aristocracy, plugging into a surge of interest that would see synthesizers and electronic sound become commonplace in rock and pop early the following decade. And yet in 1967 electronic music had already seeped into mainstream culture. For years, composers and technicians had been making electronic music for film and TV. Hitchcock had commissioned a theremin soundtrack for Spellbound (1945); The Forbidden Planet (1956) featured an entirely electronic score; Delia Derbyshire had created the Dr Who theme in 1963; and by the early 1960s, all you had to do was watch commercial TV for a few hours to hear the weird and wonderful sounds of the new world. The Sound of Tomorrow tells the compelling story of the sonic adventurers who first introduced electronic music to the masses. A network of composers, producers, technicians and inventors, they took emerging technology and with it made sound and music that was bracingly new [Publisher description]

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Status
Aims Greeley Circulation
ML1380 .B745 2012
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Language:
English

Notes

Bibliography
Includes bibliographical references (pages [251]-253), filmography, discography and lists of television shows, etc. (pages [233]-249) and index.
Description
Monterey Pop Festival, 1967. Bernie Krause and Paul Beaver demonstrate a Moog synthesizer to the assembled rock aristocracy, plugging into a surge of interest that would see synthesizers and electronic sound become commonplace in rock and pop early the following decade. And yet in 1967 electronic music had already seeped into mainstream culture. For years, composers and technicians had been making electronic music for film and TV. Hitchcock had commissioned a theremin soundtrack for Spellbound (1945); The Forbidden Planet (1956) featured an entirely electronic score; Delia Derbyshire had created the Dr Who theme in 1963; and by the early 1960s, all you had to do was watch commercial TV for a few hours to hear the weird and wonderful sounds of the new world. The Sound of Tomorrow tells the compelling story of the sonic adventurers who first introduced electronic music to the masses. A network of composers, producers, technicians and inventors, they took emerging technology and with it made sound and music that was bracingly new [Publisher description]
Citations
APA Citation (style guide)

Brend, M. (2012). The sound of tomorrow: how electronic music was smuggled into the mainstream. New York, Bloomsbury.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation (style guide)

Brend, Mark. 2012. The Sound of Tomorrow: How Electronic Music Was Smuggled Into the Mainstream. New York, Bloomsbury.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities Citation (style guide)

Brend, Mark, The Sound of Tomorrow: How Electronic Music Was Smuggled Into the Mainstream. New York, Bloomsbury, 2012.

MLA Citation (style guide)

Brend, Mark. The Sound of Tomorrow: How Electronic Music Was Smuggled Into the Mainstream. New York, Bloomsbury, 2012.

Note! Citation formats are based on standards as of July 2022. Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy.
Staff View
Grouped Work ID:
33c9d6d1-3b3f-ca74-cf72-dddcb65a216f
Go To GroupedWork

Record Information

Last Sierra Extract TimeNov 08, 2022 06:17:25 PM
Last File Modification TimeNov 08, 2022 06:17:50 PM
Last Grouped Work Modification TimeNov 08, 2022 06:17:34 PM

MARC Record

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520 |a Monterey Pop Festival, 1967. Bernie Krause and Paul Beaver demonstrate a Moog synthesizer to the assembled rock aristocracy, plugging into a surge of interest that would see synthesizers and electronic sound become commonplace in rock and pop early the following decade. And yet in 1967 electronic music had already seeped into mainstream culture. For years, composers and technicians had been making electronic music for film and TV. Hitchcock had commissioned a theremin soundtrack for Spellbound (1945); The Forbidden Planet (1956) featured an entirely electronic score; Delia Derbyshire had created the Dr Who theme in 1963; and by the early 1960s, all you had to do was watch commercial TV for a few hours to hear the weird and wonderful sounds of the new world. The Sound of Tomorrow tells the compelling story of the sonic adventurers who first introduced electronic music to the masses. A network of composers, producers, technicians and inventors, they took emerging technology and with it made sound and music that was bracingly new [Publisher description]
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